NEWS

APRIL 6 FINAL REPORT

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4TH INTERNATIONAL DAY OF SPORT FOR DEVELOPMENT AND PEACE FİNAL REPORT
( PEACE GAME BALL FOR REFUGEES CHILDREN / TURKEY )
PEACE BALL PROJECT : “PEACE GAME BALL FOR REFUGEES CHILDREN” ‪International Day of Sport for Development and Peace, April 6, 2017 Firat University Sports Sciences Faculty, Akçakiraz Municipality, Elazığ,Turkey #IDSDP2017 #WePlayTogether #IDSDP #April6 #PeaceBallProject http://peaceballproject.com/?p=442 BARIŞ TOPU KAMPANYASI “MÜLTECİ ÇOCUKLAR İÇİN BARIŞ OYUN TOPU KAMPANYASI” “6 Nisan Kalkınma ve Barış için Uluslararası Spor Günü” “We are inviting the whole mankind to this meaningful project with the wishes of ending the wars in the world and sustaining the peace” To help reach even more refugee children with lifesaving and life-changing aid, PeaceBallProject has teamed up with april6.org to harness the power of . Join us and support our relief efforts by gift peace game ball for this campaign. PeaceBallProject, which was developed based on the voluntariness of Dr.Sebahattin DEVECİOĞLU, an academician from Firat University, Sports Sciences Faculty, Elazig, Turkey giving away “Game Balls” as presents to children. https://www.april6.org/en/past-editions/2016-report/upcoming-events/peace-ball-project-worksop.html

Protecting Urban Refugee Children

Egypt. Syrian refugees

Do you live or work in a city? Are you frustrated by services and programmes that don’t reflect urban refugee children’s needs and realities? Do you have ideas for how to better engage urban refugee children, young people and their families? Do you have suggestions for how to link refugee children and families with existing local services? If you answered yes to any of the above questions, now is your chance to share your ideas as part of the “Protect Urban Refugee Children Innovation Challenge”. We want to hear ideas from UNHCR staff, partners and refugees who have urban experience. As of 2017, more than half of the world’s 16.5 million refugees live in urban areas. Many of these urban refugees are children who will spend their entire childhood in the city.

Living in cities can potentially offer refugee children and their families opportunities and benefits that are unavailable in camps or rural areas, including greater possibilities for income generation or employment, better access to a fuller range of education and health services, and more chances for integration in a diverse urban setting. But, many urban refugee families struggle financially. They share the difficulties of the urban poor and also face an array of difficulties related to their forced displacement and legal status. This makes it especially hard for them to make a living and to access the services and opportunities that cities offer. This combination undermines the protective capacity of families and communities and compounds protection risks for children.